Micras loses significant micronation

GENEVA –  Since its foundation more than 15 years ago, Alexandria has played a central role in the Micras community, building its reputation from a shaky start under the name of Madland to one of community leader. Its story has now been consigned to the history books.

In an open letter to the Micras community on July 25, Alexandria’s founder and first-and-only monarch, Edgard Carrillo, announced its sudden dissolution. “I feel creatively constrained and bankrupt. The focus on creating something fun and engaging for myself was shifted towards winning petty squabbles with other Micran participants,” explained Carrillo.

Recent years arguably saw Alexandria’s core activity decline into persistent squabbling, contributing significantly to Carrillo’s stated loss of focus. Largely sustained by election campaigns and parliamentary debates in which political parties sparred, often over repetitive issues, Alexandria’s ability to focus development on other aspects of its identity became impaired. That squabbling translated to the intermicronational community where it found itself primarily involved in rival alliances, the resulting conflicts, and very much motivated by an imperialistic desire to expand its Micras world map territory.

“The time for judging Alexandria’s strength and progress by post counts and pixels is over,” said Carrillo with an implied sigh of relief.

Yet, as with other micronations that have made similar announcements in the past, there remains the possibility that Alexandria may one day rejoin the community. Such a decision, according to Carrillo, will be guided by his ability to regain the passion and creativity necessary to create the Alexandria that he always wanted, as opposed to the one it became.

As for Carrillo’s personal involvement in the Micras community, he will remain a contributor to other micronations and efforts.

Read more about Alexandria’s history by visiting our archive of 295 related news articles published since 2004.

 

Micras loses significant micronation

Ecological stewardship declaration celebrated

Following on the Alcatraz Environmental Treaty of 2015, micronations have begun signing onto a new environmental agreement en masse. That agreement, known as the Micronational Declaration on Ecological Stewardship (MDES), first adopted at MicroCon 2017 last month, aims to promote environmentally-friendly practices in signatory micronations.

The MDES brings together micronations that are concerned with humanity’s negative impact on the health of world ecosystems, aiming to galvanize a group effort to minimize it. That effort is especially motivated by a perceived failure of macronational governments to prioritize ecological stewardship, as well as the continued denial of anthropogenic climate change by others.

Calling for “more dramatic action … to minimize the negative effects of climate change,” the MDES seeks to empower micronations to recognize their ability to improve their local ecosystems, whether through waste diversion, ethical treatment of animals, avoiding the use of genetically-modified food crops, or preventing the proliferation of invasive species, among others.

Supporting that empowerment, the content of the declaration largely focuses on outlining local strategies that micronations can implement to improve their ecological stewardship. Strategies fleshed out in the declaration include ways in which to reduce waste, carbon dioxide emissions, and water pollution. It also encourages micronationalists to recognize an animal’s right to life, liberty and reproductive freedom, except where the animal is designated for food slaughter, threatening to humans, other animals or property, or an invasive species.

According to the Flandrensis government, one of the MDES’ most vocal supporters, the declaration was the fruit of a six-month discussion between twenty-five like-minded micronationalists from all over the world. “[The MDES in combination with the Alcatraz Treaty and other ecological charters] lays out a blueprint for reasonably addressing the topics of climate change, water conservation, biological diversity, and more,” it said in a press release.

Practically speaking, while loudly critical of macronational government inaction of ecological stewardship, the wording of the MDES makes it more an example of similar inaction than a reasonable blueprint. Quick to direct their condemnation, the signatories have agreed to a text that is wholly non-binding, with language limited to merely “encouraging”, “advising” or “urging” compliance. There is no expectation or requirement for any signatory to report on its efforts to improve ecological stewardship, let alone enact any of the included strategies.

Beyond being an exercise in political grandstanding, it is unclear what, if anything, the MDES will actually achieve, despite it being much celebrated and receiving strong support from influential micronations such as Flandrensis. As a follow-on to the Alcatraz Environmental Treaty effort, it may arguably prove to be underwhelming.

Ecological stewardship declaration celebrated

MCS policy faces new scrutiny

HUB.MN – It has been almost three years to the day since the MCS adopted its last major systemic reforms; however, change may again be on the horizon for the nearly-seventeen year-old intermicronational organization.

The increasingly-dominant presence of large micronations such as Shireroth, Stormark, Natopia and Alexandria, as well as the division of the community into two major alliances motivated Giles Melang to put forward a proposal that, if adopted, would limit the total Micras territory any one micronation can hold. The proposal is unique in that MCS Charter reforms are usually driven by the opposite desire to reduce minimum requirements so that micronations can retain their assigned territory longer through bouts of low or inactivity.

“We live in an age of, well, empires … through cleverness or sheer brute force (and popularity) [some can] extend their reach across the majority of Micras,” suggested Melang. Such a scenario unfolding, in his mind, would impede the progress of the smaller micronations, though admittedly he does not foresee it as an impending or given event. Rather, his proposal is meant to guard against the mere possibility in the future. To that end, his suggested territory limit on any one individual micronation is a generous one-half of the Micras map.

The proposal has generated wider discussion. “On Micras, anyone with a sufficiently narcissistic approach to the narrative development of their subject realms is free to bloat their holdings across the plant without reference to the inherently finite or cyclical nature of colonial power,” Krasniy Yastreb observed, proposing that the limitation instead apply to individuals than micronations.

Such an application is seen as a way to prevent one person from creating or controlling a majority of the Micras micronations, and therefore its territory, as their personal fiefdom. In such a lopsided situation, Yastreb worries that the amount of claimable land would run short for other participants and newcomers.”What is acquired is acquired forever, subject to the ruler’s activity level,” he suggested, referring to current policy governing forced territory reduction/removal by the MCS Administrative Council. Under that policy, the subject micronation’s population must maintain a minimum average of one post per two days, or similar wiki activity; failing to do so for three consecutive months may result in territory reduction or complete removal.

Like Melang, the current situation on Micras does not suggest that Yastreb’s worries are likely to become reality in the near future. Such a view is held by Barnaby Hands, a key member of the Administrative Council. “We’re far from reaching that problem yet,” said Hands, indicating his preference that the Administrative Council simply say to any person or micronation starting to dominate the map, “hey, leave some room”.

Other key members of the Administrative Council, including Chairman Craitman Pellegrino, have not voiced an opinion on the matter as of press time.

MCS policy faces new scrutiny

Essian Democrats scold Frisch

RÉMA – After a crushing defeat in last month’s elections in which it secured only 2 seats, the Essian Democrats Party is hoping to capitalize on a failure by the victor, and head of government (heaminister), James Frisch, to convene parliament.

In a sternly worded editorial yesterday in local media, party leader Horatio Eden implied that Frisch had undemocratic motives in stymieing parliament’s opening. “When attempts were made by his Lordship to open [the parliament], the Heaminister rejected them,” charged Eden. Eden suggested that the Essian Commonwealth’s monarch, whose reserve powers include convening parliament, was influenced by Frisch to not do so until an as-of-yet chosen date. Frisch has not responded to the accusation as of press time.

For Eden, there is only one solution to the situation, and it is not to negotiate with Frisch to resolve the matter. Rather, Eden proposes that the Green Party members of parliament, who form a majority with 6 seats, abandon Frisch and join the Democrats. He suggested that his party was ready to govern and would, within a week of assuming the majority position in the parliament, set a date to convene to debate four pieces of legislation his party has drafted.

“[Our parties] have very few differences insofar as legislative agenda,” said Eden, “If the [Green Party members] truly wish to see an active Essian government, they will see it – as we do – as their civic duty to provide [the Democrats] with the legislative mandate required.”

Essian Democrats scold Frisch

FMF World Cup Week 1 ends

SVORGAS – This year’s FMF World Cup, the first since 2015, is underway in Senya as the Micras community comes together once more in it’s most popular international competition. Today marked the conclusion of the first week of the five-week tournament.

If there was one take away from the past week, it is that this year’s tournament will be marked by an unusually high goal scoring. A total of 64 goals were scored across the 16 matches played, including 8 between Natopia and Elwynn in their July 10th match. The week also included two 6 – 0 shutouts, as Craitland and Mercury dominated Gotzborg and Jingdao, respectively.

The result was particularly disappointing for Gotzborg, which finished at the top of its group with 14 goals-for during the qualifying round. It will attempt to recover when it plays next on July 17th; it faces Birgeshir, which it last played to a one-all draw in 2015. Jingdao, meanwhile, fell further back today in a scoreless draw with Nova England. It will seek its first win as a World Cup competitor on July 18th against the also winless Natopian team.

As the tournament moves into the second week, Lakkvia, Alexandria, Craitland and Mercury lead their respective groups with six points apiece.

FMF World Cup Week 1 ends

YAMOs remain relevant, argues Romanicus

For nearly two decades, micronationalists have decried intermicronational organizations as ultimately useless. With the founding of each new organization, micronationalists have with striking exasperation voiced “YAMO!” for Yet Another Micronational Organization. Many organizations quickly, or ultimately, fit the YAMO bill; however, Prince Romanicus of the Holy Confederation of the Violet Star argues that such organizations can, in fact, succeed from the outset.

Publishing his latest treatise on micropatriology yesterday, Romanicus suggests that the failing of any intermicronational organization rests on its inherent politically superficial nature. “Micronations have a very strong independent spirit … this means that by no means will any serious micronation allow another foreign entity to control its politics in any way,” wrote Romanicus. That legislation passed by an organization is only enforced locally if a member state government has the political will to do so further diminishes the organization’s relevance.

To fix this discouraging reality, Romanicus recommends that an organization be audience specific, catering to one or a combination of religion, ethnicity, cultural group, or ideology. Shared traits amongst the member states would promote unity and increase the organization’s relevance. It is also important, in his opinion, that the executive of the organization temper their dreams of close integration amongst the member states, as such impeding on sovereignty would discourage participation.

A successful organization, it is argued, will be one that admits only “serious” micronations, which Romanicus defines as one with a population of at least 100 individuals living in close proximity as opposed to a population operating within the confines of the Internet. “By no means am I criticizing simulationist or people without communities,” he said, “but to make YAMOs [worth] anything, micronations must be worth something as well.”

Importantly, Romanicus suggests, an organization must have a relevant purpose. Practical activities that he believes such an organization can focus on include fundraisers to support macronational government lobbying, the prevention of micronational war, collective security, and large-scale projects such as public works infrastructure development.

Finally, those involved in the creation and operation of the organization must not let themselves become disillusioned with the effort. “YAMOs exist in the way they are because of micronationalism itself, embrace them as our future for they are the vessels that micronations will use in the future to consolidate power in a hostile world,” he emphasized.

YAMOs remain relevant, argues Romanicus

Interview: Henry (Twain) Clément

CS: It’s been almost a year since we last sat down with you. Perhaps the biggest change, in terms of your intermicronational participation, is that you are now the Acting Chairman of GUM. One of the notable initiatives that you’re currently leading is the second 24 Hour Quorum. It’s been five years since it was first held. What do you hope the latest quorum will achieve and why hold it now?

HC: The goal of this Quorum is to, very broadly, bring our community together. The community isn’t as tightly knit as it was five years ago, and while that’s not a problem that can be directly confronted, we can work to improve personal relationships between one another through events such as this. We will also be including several younger micronationalists as temporary delegates so they can gain experience and reputation before applying in their own right. The simplest reason that it is being held now is that the idea was proposed and I liked the idea being front-and-center on my agenda.

CS: Will the quorum again take on a philanthropic approach this time around and if so, are there preferred charities?

HC: Yes. The 24 Hour Quorum is planned as a charity event. We have gauged how many people will be making donations, however have not asked to what charity the delegates will be donating to. For the most part, donation is left up to the individual to decide.

CS: What other initiatives do you have planned for your time as a member of GUM‘s executive?

HC: We’ve already done several other things. We created a GUM email address that I use under gum@micronations.wiki, we are working on a GUM Portal, and I am working with King Tarik – my nominee for Statistics Secretary who was confirmed recently – to reform the Statistics office, as well as potentially doing the same for the office of the Media Secretary. We are also working on cultural exhibitions that will be published soon. There are a few other things that are in their infancy that I’ll avoid talking about because of this fact.

CS: Can you tell us more about what you want the Statistics Secretary and Media Secretary to accomplish during their mandates?

HC: The main goal of the Statistics Secretary and Media Secretary during my term is to bring the offices back to activity and their regular updates and reports. The Statistics Secretary will provide weekly updates to Quorum and a comprehensive statistical report every three months, just as the Media Secretary will continue to update the Quorum overviews in GUM News. More details on the precise plans will be released once we get the reformations of the offices complete, which should be sometime before the 24 Hour Quorum.

CS: Beyond the intermicronational stage, you’re also the monarch of the Essian Commonwealth, which was refounded back in January. For our readers who are unfamiliar, perhaps you can provide some background on the Commonwealth? Is it a follow-on to your previous project, the Quetican Islands?

HC: The Essian Commonwealth was originally founded in June 2015 as the direct successor to the dissolved Federated States of America. After the dissolution of the Federated States in May 2016 I ventured into other projects – the foremost being the Democratic Republic of the Quetican Islands. The Commonwealth obviously was reformed after the Quetican Islands, but isn’t a legal successor and will not claim to be.

CS: Still on the topic of the Commonwealth, are there any notable or exciting projects you have planned for the micronation for which you’re willing to share some details?

HC: Projects are a central part of development in the Essian Commonwealth. It has had to take a backseat since I’ve taken up my duties in the Grand Unified Micronational, however I am very much still invested in the projects we are doing. I’m doing a lot of cultural projects with music – I’ve actually written a few songs myself – and there’s also some art and other cultural bits that we’ve been engaged in. You’ll be able to see a lot of this on showcase in the GUM International Exhibitions, a project that should be published within the coming weeks.

CS: You’ve also relaunched plans for Micronation Report with Henry Twain, a television program that unfortunately died on the development table in 2016. Can you tell us more about this exciting cultural project?

HC: Yes. The Micronation Report was my plan to make a radio show to fill the void left by RadioMicro. Unfortunately, my two interviews planned for the debut episode – those of Brandon Wu and John Churchill – fell through when they requested me to trash the interview for privacy reasons. How long it’ll take for the reboot, titled Clement!, to actually premier is yet to be determined – I do have many duties which are of higher priority – however I’m hoping for it to be within the next few months.

CS: Much of your participation in the community last year was within the field micronational economics, though you seem to have moved on from this as a focus. Is there a particular reason for the change of heart? Is “Henry Twain the Economist” a thing of the past for good?

HC: At this point – more than anything else – I’m doing whatever I enjoy. Economics was fun, as was the QMSE and the MEG, but now I have much more I can and should be doing. To many people, I’m still ‘the Economist’, but to me, there’s much more ahead.

Interview: Henry (Twain) Clément