Babkha readies for first elections in more than two years

Two years ago with its national legislature ailing from inactivity, the Kingdom of Babkha, then under the reign of Ardashir Khan, moved to set aside its political party system to focus on reforms to maintain the micronation’s health without the negative effects of partisanship. Now, under the guidance of Grand Vizier Hesam Jahandar, the Kingdom is preparing to hold its first elections since mid-2005, with an election planned for the position of Grand Vizier.

In his statement to the populace, the Grand Vizier reflected that Babkha had “ignored the rule of our constitutional monarchy due to inactivity in the past, laziness, instability, and a confusing governmental system.” This is in stark comparison to the Kingdom’s current level of activity and more easily understandable system of government (due in large part to the Babkhan constitution becoming a reality after a half-decade of drafting). The Grand Vizier called for the reintroduction of elections so that Babkha could “return to the compassionate and well-respected realm we were known for years ago.”

The citizenry has largely embraced the idea of holding an election, with many advocating the return of the national political parties of years past to add a dimension of partisanship to the electoral process. Darius Rugahi called for the reformation of the parties so that each could “entice the populace with their version of love and peace for the kingdom.” The Grand Vizier voiced his agreement with the notion and has declared that the political heads of each registered party will compete for the leadership of the national government, much as is done in other jurisdictions both micronationally and macronationally.

No time frame has been released for the elections as of publication.

About the Author

Liam Sinclair
Owner/Senior Editor. One of the longest-serving micronational journalists, Sinclair started reporting in 2001. His work has since been recognized by several community awards.
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