IMO invokes past name, desires new success

KALTSSTADT – A new UN-style intermicronational organization has launched, hoping to succeed where others have failed. Borrowing the name “United Micronations” from past endeavours, it remains to be seen if the organization can shirk the YAMO label.

As the (at least) seventh intermicronational organization to carry the name, the United Micronations finds itself struggling against the failed reputation of its predecessors. That struggle may be lessened by a comparatively-unique approach: an annual in-person summit that will complement more routine Internet-facilitated communications. Such an event may develop stronger interpersonal relationships between micronational leaders and add longevity to the organization.

The first summit is tentatively scheduled for Normanton, United Kingdom, from June 26 to 28, 2018. The member states, of which there are 10 as of press time, will discuss diplomatic, economic, and integration topics, as well as the more specific threat of North Korea’s nuclear programme in the likely scenario that it is still a concern.

Organized by the Kingdom of Catan, a founding member, the summit will be accessible to the press and public who can purchase tickets for a fee of £1-10, and based on the tickets advertised, it will include an evening gala.

Underlying these efforts is the ever-present concern that the United Micronations will not survive long enough to see that June date. Public details on its operation are currently limited; however, a key part of its growth and stability, the election of a Secretary-General, will occur sometime after the close of nominations on September 22, according to a media report.

IMO invokes past name, desires new success

Novapara hopes for renewal

FORT FUCA – Just weeks ago, Novapara, well-known for its professional-looking infographics and software initiatives, was placed into hiatus by its founder and leader, Mr Xavier. Yet already plans are underway for its re-birth in 2018.

A one-man micronation, Novapara ultimately met its demise on August 26 when Mr Xavier ran out of motivation to invest time in a project that had struggled to attract other participants to share the workload. The ensuing indefinite hiatus, however, became more finite today, though the same challenge remains to be overcome.

“The primary contributor to the failing government is the lack of people running it, ” Mr Xavier said in announcing a timeframe for Novapara’s return.

In order to attract others to the micronation, a “first half-year” agenda has been released, divided into three 2-month periods. The first two months will be dedicated to required maintenance on the Novian website, including its interactive citizens portal. Those efforts would be followed by work on the constitution and internal organization in months 3 and 4, while the last months will be spent creating new national identity and domestic products. Specific attention may also be paid to the expansion of the Novian Bank and its NovaPay financial services portal.

As for when the community may see the reborn Novapara, it is hoped that early-2018 will provide more favourable scheduling conditions; however, it was nonetheless cautioned that the attempt at planning a revival may still permanently fail.

Novapara hopes for renewal

Consultations launched as Scotia seeks future

LYONESSE – One month since a failed, divisive, referendum on its future, the Principality of Scotia has reiterated its goal of independence from Scotland and launched a wide-ranging public consultation.

Questions regarding the micronation’s continuance began following the August 6th vote in which 49% of the population voted for autonomy within Scotland, while 48% desired preparing for full independence. A further 2% wanted full integration with Scotland. The referendum was declared a failure, as neither side reached a majority, causing the government to fall. The Sovereign Prince, Charles II, decided that Scotia would continue to work toward full sovereignty, spurred by the acquisition of an island in Scotland to support the building of a physical community.

The island, according to the Prince, is the first step toward fulfilling his vision for Scotia. “As we now have an island, the next 3-4 years will be very important to us in setting our foundations, solidifying our identity and preparing ourselves to declare independence as a fully sustainable nation,” he said in prepared remarks introducing a public consultation. At 27 sq. m., the island, the location of which has not been publicly announced, is reported to have a current population of 20, a range of existing community infrastructure, as well as a variety of livestock and agricultural foodstuffs.

The survey-based public consultation is comprehensive, seeking input from all interested individuals on a broad range of topics, from matters as small as choosing a national animal to more fundamental ones, such as revenue generation and the structure of the Royal Family. The consultation also seeks input on setting Scotia’s priorities ahead of any declaration of independence.

One such priority will be the formation of a stable government in the wake of the referendum. A month later, Scotia continues to lack a Prime Minister and National Council, despite pleas on its Twitter feed for citizens to come forward. It is unclear when or if a functional government will take office.

What is clear is that the decision to continue toward full independence, contrary to the will of 51% of the voting population who favoured some form of integration with Scotland, has set a difficult path ahead for Scotia.

 

Consultations launched as Scotia seeks future

Micras loses significant micronation

GENEVA –  Since its foundation more than 15 years ago, Alexandria has played a central role in the Micras community, building its reputation from a shaky start under the name of Madland to one of community leader. Its story has now been consigned to the history books.

In an open letter to the Micras community on July 25, Alexandria’s founder and first-and-only monarch, Edgard Carrillo, announced its sudden dissolution. “I feel creatively constrained and bankrupt. The focus on creating something fun and engaging for myself was shifted towards winning petty squabbles with other Micran participants,” explained Carrillo.

Recent years arguably saw Alexandria’s core activity decline into persistent squabbling, contributing significantly to Carrillo’s stated loss of focus. Largely sustained by election campaigns and parliamentary debates in which political parties sparred, often over repetitive issues, Alexandria’s ability to focus development on other aspects of its identity became impaired. That squabbling translated to the intermicronational community where it found itself primarily involved in rival alliances, the resulting conflicts, and very much motivated by an imperialistic desire to expand its Micras world map territory.

“The time for judging Alexandria’s strength and progress by post counts and pixels is over,” said Carrillo with an implied sigh of relief.

Yet, as with other micronations that have made similar announcements in the past, there remains the possibility that Alexandria may one day rejoin the community. Such a decision, according to Carrillo, will be guided by his ability to regain the passion and creativity necessary to create the Alexandria that he always wanted, as opposed to the one it became.

As for Carrillo’s personal involvement in the Micras community, he will remain a contributor to other micronations and efforts.

Read more about Alexandria’s history by visiting our archive of 295 related news articles published since 2004.

 

Micras loses significant micronation

Essian Democrats scold Frisch

RÉMA – After a crushing defeat in last month’s elections in which it secured only 2 seats, the Essian Democrats Party is hoping to capitalize on a failure by the victor, and head of government (heaminister), James Frisch, to convene parliament.

In a sternly worded editorial yesterday in local media, party leader Horatio Eden implied that Frisch had undemocratic motives in stymieing parliament’s opening. “When attempts were made by his Lordship to open [the parliament], the Heaminister rejected them,” charged Eden. Eden suggested that the Essian Commonwealth’s monarch, whose reserve powers include convening parliament, was influenced by Frisch to not do so until an as-of-yet chosen date. Frisch has not responded to the accusation as of press time.

For Eden, there is only one solution to the situation, and it is not to negotiate with Frisch to resolve the matter. Rather, Eden proposes that the Green Party members of parliament, who form a majority with 6 seats, abandon Frisch and join the Democrats. He suggested that his party was ready to govern and would, within a week of assuming the majority position in the parliament, set a date to convene to debate four pieces of legislation his party has drafted.

“[Our parties] have very few differences insofar as legislative agenda,” said Eden, “If the [Green Party members] truly wish to see an active Essian government, they will see it – as we do – as their civic duty to provide [the Democrats] with the legislative mandate required.”

Essian Democrats scold Frisch

Constancia enshrines information access

Despite the increasingly toxic intermicronational political climate, and resultant militarism, across Micras due the ongoing Hammish civil war, Constancia continues to support the sanctity of open government.

With two-thirds of parliamentarians in favour, the Disclosure and Access to Information Act received assent today, as opposition parties united against the government. The government opposed the legislation on the basis that foreign states and troublesome citizens may use disclosed information maliciously.

As one of the only Micras micronations to have ever enacted such dedicated legislation, Constancia has committed to the release of most national and regional government information. Any citizen, whether at home or abroad, may request disclosure from the government, which is required to respond within three months.

A hallmark of open government, the legislation nonetheless limits public access to certain information, such as that pertaining to the micronation’s military and national security. Also subject to withholding is a citizen’s private information, except income, and any information concerning the head of state (the Basileus) and his court.

The Act further enshrines the right of the head of government, the Mesazõn, to exempt any information from disclosure on a case-by-case basis. With the government vocally opposed to freedom of information in general, it remains to be seen whether it will use that clause to ultimately neuter the Act. The increasing military paranoia gripping the Micras community does little to ease such concern.

Constancia enshrines information access

Confrontation in Northern Sea sparks world instability

NORTHERN SEA – For the past month, civil war has been raging through the mainland of the Commonwealth of Hamland. A confusing war with several groups changing sides, losing and winning allies and receiving military, financial and diplomatic support from several groups, threatens to expand in an even larger conflict.

While the Hammish possession of Neo Patrovia in Northern Apollonia stayed relatively untouched by the devastations and immense cruelty during the civil war, as the Ravaillac Loyalists had succesfully seized power. This changed when the National Provisional Authority, backed by a Shirerithian proxy organisation, launched an invasion and attack on the coastal fortresses.

The sudden emergence of conflict in the region, together with the mining of the Cameleo River and increase in pirate activities, worried both the Jingdaoese and Gerenian authorities. The thought of having another nation (Natopia already shares a border with Jingdao) at its borders with friendly ties to arch-nemesis Shireroth could also have played a role to trigger alarm bells in the Heavenly Palace of Daocheng.

A joint proclamation between Jingdao and Gerenia was made to keep the peace in the region. Peacekeeping forces were raised and a naval blockade was announced, to limit the import of enemy soldiers and supplies from overseas. Food and other non-military goods have to pass through custom services in East Gerenia, after which they are send through Jingdao and land routes to the Hammish cities. Those actions would all be executed under supervision of the Batavian-Stormarkian organisation Noblesse Oblige.

This peacekeeping action, however, met with a sharp reaction from the Ministry of Military Affairs, which started mobilising its navy. The Jingdaoese countermeasure – mobilisation of both land and naval forces – reflected those increasing tensions.

At this moment, to avoid a further bloodshed, both parties have come to an informal agreement to limit skirmishes to the Northern Sea.

 

 

Confrontation in Northern Sea sparks world instability