Random thoughts on Politika

Editorial

While most nations are more concerned with the recent terrorist attacks on nations such as Babkha, and Menelmacar, it seems that Politika is becoming downright paranoid over the possible motives of its citizens who aren’t in “the loop,” along with the possible actions of the micronational community against it due to some acts by certain Politikans. This view is only echoed by the recent creation of the Directorate of Internal Security and Intelligence (DISI).

The DISI, under the Internal Security Act (2003), currently tabled in the House of Commons, will have the power from “any sanctioned organization, ministry, or citizen of the state.” The act, which has a clause that would keep it from public domain (unless you’re citizen of Politika) upon passage, can be considered just another way to monitor the average citizen. However, in these not so “average” times, with the threats of “Baracaoan” spies at Politika’s doorsteps, the nation and its government can’t really be accused of trying to reduce the rights of its citizens. With voting currently in progress, to the credit of the ruling party, headed by President Bobby, the bill is failing. This would also be a prudent time to mention that the bill was proposed by the local fascist of the nation, Andrew MacNeardy. Even if the act fails, however, the DISI will remain as it was around a few days before the act was even proposed if memory recalls.

If the bill does pass, will it really be the fault of Politika? Given the past month or so, a lot of animosity towards Politika has been expressed by certain individuals in Puritania who are under the impression that President Bobby rules like a dictator in Politika and always gets his way, and that Politika is a terrorist state…it’s no more terrorist than, say, Baracao, whose current Chairman, or his sibling, drove Peter Little out of micronationalism by continually harassing him, however, do we judge Baracao by the acts of just one of its citizens? No. Then why should we judge Politika by what is sometimes seen as inappropriate acts by one of its citizens? People like Kuralyov are the worse of the “blame the nation for what one of its citizens does” group of micronationalists. So far, with every terrorist attack in the past month, he’s managed to fit in some type of finger pointing at Bobby and Politika, even when those two entities haven’t even been involved.

Constant finger pointing by people like Kuralyov towards a nation for acts it has no committed, nor does it support, only serves the destruction of civil freedoms by making that nation worried for its own security, thus forcing it to propose legislation to limit the rights of its citizens.

About the Author

Liam Sinclair
Owner/Senior Editor. One of the longest-serving micronational journalists, Sinclair started reporting in 2001. His work has since been recognized by several community awards.
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